Near Silence – Artists Support for Japan

Microscopics have gathered together a group of artists including myself to create a free compilation album of chilled electronica for anyone who donates to the Red Cross Japan appeal. Heres some more about the ‘Near Silence’ album from the Microscopics blog –

A supercooled album fractured with exclusives, classics and the new.
Richard Barbieri has exclusively re-recorded his classic Japan track ‘The Experience of Swimming’; Charles Webster has donated an exclusive mix from his brand new January Tuesday project, which was only recorded last week; and Eno colloborator Roedelius, one of the electronic pioneers alongside Kraftwerk, has donated his classic ‘Wenn der Südwind Weht’; plus an unreleased High Skies track and new material from Woob and Anne Garner.”

More details and links below, share them and help spread the word.

www.microscopics.co.uk/japan
http://bit.ly/nsilence

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Mat Jarvis – Gas, High Skies Interview Part II – ‘Breeding Mutant Synthesis’

This is Part II of an Interview with ex-emitter Mat Jarvis who runs the Microscopics blog and records under the name High Skies. (Part I here)

S9: What are you currently working on?

MJ: I’m working on videos for some of the Sounds of Earth tracks. When I was writing them, images and visual ideas would pop into my head, so I thought I’d create them to make them real. I’m editing lots of glowing lights at the moment.

S9: You mentioned you dont use many softsynths but where do you see the future of synthesis? and what would be your perfect synthesised future?

MJ: I think the immediate future is more of the same, but more refined, so more VA softsynths and more classic analog synth recreations, but with more depth and more life. I think they’re already good and in a mix would be hard to tell from the real thing, but unfortunately a lot of my sounds are very exposed so the differences are more obvious.

In the long term I can see more resynthesis, so the starting point would be a sample of say a trumpet, which would be analyzed and the software would separate the trumpet from the vibrato and tremolo and envelope etc. Quite boring for recreating trumpets, but feed it with weird sounds and you could deconstruct sounds a molecule at a time, selecting which harmonics are used, or pushing the harmonics to sound more like glass or a vibrating steel plate. You could feed it an OBX pad and Moog bass and it would take elements from each, which you could select -kind of a Breeding Mutant Synthesis (BMS?)

My perfect future would be to have a few perfect analogue recreations but with one hardware surface that reconfigures to whatever you’re using, a Jupiter 8 one moment, a mixing desk the next.

The Microcopics Moog available from Microscopics.

S9: What do you listen to / what do you avoid listening to?

[Read more…]